Sunday, January 26, 2014

Kuih Rose

First of all, I would like to thank everyone for sharing all the wonderful cookies with our Bake-Along Theme : Chinese New Year Cookies. So far, there are 177 links! There is still another day, until tomorrow at 12 midnight, before the linky closes. I have not visited some of the links yet, but I'm coming to that, hopefully soon! I know that everyone is busy with cookies to make and other things to prepare for the coming festive CNY, and we (Lena, Zoe and myself), really appreciate the time you took to link your cookies posts! Thank you!

Today, I'm sharing another traditional cookies that is a favourite with all races, Kuih Rose. It is sweet and crispy with that wonderful aroma from the coconut milk and eggs. In our Nyonya household, we called these cookies as Kuih Rose, which is obvious, why it is named as such, from the shape of the cookies, which look like a rose. The Malay call these cookies as Kuih Loyang and the Chinese calls it, Honeycomb Cookies. 

These cookies however are a little labour intensive. Mixing the ingredients are pretty easy. The most tiring part is the frying of these cookies. It took me about 2-1/2 hours to fry about 2 tins of cookies (I use Jacob's biscuits tins). By the time I finished, my legs felt like after running in a marathon, alongside Zoe! Hi Zoe! :)
And I made these one more time, on the next day!

I have been frying these cookies for each Chinese New Year and even though I'm feeling pretty lazy this year, I could not, not make these! These are pretty addictive! Besides, my son has already asked me much earlier whether will I be making these cookies.  



You can find various recipes from the internet, but the recipe I'm sharing today is the one my beloved late mom used to make. 

Here's how the cookies are made :

 The Kuih Rose moulds, which I have been using for years.


  1. Sieve rice flour and plain flour in a large mixing bowl. Put aside.
  2. Beat eggs with a hand whisk in a large bowl. Add in caster sugar and whisk until evenly combined. 
  3. Pour the coconut milk into the egg mixture and whisk to combine. 
  4. Add the mixture to the flour and stir with a wooden spoon to combine. 


  1. The mixture will be lumpy. Use a hand whisk to whisk the mixture to break up the lumps as much as possible until mixture is smooth. 
  2. Place a large sieve over the large mixing bowl (you can use the same mixing bowl which you have used for the egg mixture), and pour the mixture into the sieve to remove any lumps. Discard the residue lumps. 

  1. The mixture will be smooth. 
  2. Meanwhile, get ready a small deep bowl with a small spoon. Pour some of the batter into the bowl. 
  3. To fry the Kuih Ros : Heat up a large wok and pour enough oil to deep-fry the cookies. When the oil is hot, add in the pandan leaves. It will bubble and pop! Remove the leaves when you can smell the fragrant aroma of the pandan leaves, and there are no more bubbles. Pandan leaves will be cripsy, discard the leaves.
  4. Place the Kuih Ros mould into the hot oil for 1-2 minutes to heat up the mould. Turn down heat to low.
  5. When the mould is hot, remove the mould from the hot oil and shake off excess oil back into the wok. 



  
  1. Stir the batter in the small bowl. Place the mould into the batter, until the batter comes to just below the top level of the mould. Do not cover the mould completely with the batter, otherwise you would have a hard time removing the cookie from the mould. (if it happens, then use a small knife to release it). 
  2. The batter would stick to the hot mould all around.
  3. Place the mould into the hot oil, do not release the mould or let it touch the base of the wok. 
  4. Wait for 2-3 seconds, then give a gentle shake, lift up the mould and the cookie should come off easily. Place the mould back in the hot oil for about 10 seconds to heat it up again and repeat from step 1. Always remember to stir the batter before you coat the hot mould with the batter.
  5. Fry the cookie on both sides until golden brown. Watch out for it as it would take only about a minute or so. Remove with a flat slotted ladle and drain on kitchen paper.
  6. Have ready a small wire sieve to remove all the bits and pieces of the batter during frying, you would not want them to stick to your Kuih Rose.



Drain the cookies on a flat cookie tray lined with newspapers and double layers of kitchen paper towels. Cool completely and store in air-tight containers.


Crispy, fragrant Kuih Rose




Kuih Rose
(recipe : Bibik Chwee)
300gm rice flour
60gm plain flour
5 large eggs
300gm caster sugar
250ml freshly squeezed thick coconut milk, add enough water to make 1-3/4 cup
2 pandan leaves, cut to 4-5" sections
cooking oil

  1. Sieve rice flour and plain flour in a large mixing bowl. Put aside.
  2. Beat eggs with a hand whisk in a large bowl. Add in caster sugar and whisk until evenly combined. 
  3. Pour the coconut milk into the egg mixture and whisk to combine. 
  4. Add the mixture to the flour and stir with a wooden spoon to combine. It will be in lumps. Use the hand whisk to whisk the mixture to break up the lumps as much as possible until mixture is smooth.
  5. Place a large sieve over the large mixing bowl (which you have used for the egg mixture), and pour the mixture into the sieve to remove any lumps. Discard the residue lumps. The mixture will be smooth.
  6. To fry the Kuih Ros : Heat up a large wok and pour enough oil to deep-fry the cookies. When the oil is hot, add in the pandan leaves. It will bubble and pop! Remove the leaves when you can smell the fragrant aroma of the pandan leaves, and there are no more bubbles. Pandan leaves will be cripsy, discard the leaves.
  7. Place the mould into the hot oil for 1-2 minutes to heat up the mould.
  8. Meanwhile, get ready a small deep bowl with a small spoon. Pour some of the batter into the bowl. 
  9. When the mould is hot, remove the mould from the hot oil and shake off excess oil back into the wok. Turn down heat to low.
  10. Place the mould into the batter, until the batter comes to just below the top level of the mould. Do not cover the mould completely with the batter, otherwise you would have a hard time removing the cookie from the mould. (if it happens, then use a small knife to release it). The batter would stick to the hot mould all around, place the mould into the hot oil, do not let it touch the base of the wok. Wait for 2-3 seconds, then give a gentle shake, lift up the mould and the cookie should come off easily. Place the mould back in the hot oil for about 10 seconds to heat it up again and repeat from step 9. 
  11. Fry the cookie on both sides until golden brown. Watch out for it as it would take only about a minute or so. Remove with a flat slotted ladle and drain on kitchen paper.
  12. Leave to cool completely and store in air-tight containers.
Tip :
~ Use a flat slotted ladle.
~ Use a large cookie tray, line with double layers of newspaper, then double layers of kitchen paper towels.    You would want to maintain the shape of the Kuih Rose, so use a flat cookie sheet for this step.
~ Have ready a small wire sieve to remove all the bits and pieces of the batter during frying, you would not want them to stick to your Kuih Rose.

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To join our blog hop, bake any Chinese New Year Cookies and link your post to our Bake-Along linky. The link will stay open for three weeks, from 6th January until 27th January.
Please visit my baking buddies, Lena from Frozen Wings and Zoe from Bake For Happy Kids, and all our friends who has baked along with us in the linky below :

Bake-Along shall take a break in February and we shall meet again in March for our Bake-Along #58 , with our bake, Cream Cheese Brownies from How To Be A Domestic Goddess, pg 194 by Nigella Lawson or you may get the recipe here. The linky will start from 6th to 15th March.


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17 comments:

  1. Hi Joyce! I am so behind in my blog visits. This kuih rose is very labor intensive and I love the crunchy and yummy taste. Hope to eat some during CNY :)

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  2. Waa! This kuih looks fabulous, Joyce ! It's been ages since I makan this goodies ! Very addictive , I can makan 1 dozen in one sitting ! LOL

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  3. Joyce, I love these cookies, but don't think I'll ever attempt them since it requires deep frying..... pandai makan only! :D

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  4. Now that's one truly traditional cookie , well done!,

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  5. Hi Joyce , those cookies looks addictive and delicious . I will be looking for some of those moulds , never seen any in my neck of the woods , Thanks for sharing :).

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  6. Hi Joyce,

    First let me tell you, oh my goodness, what lovely cookies! They must taste heavenly!!! You did such a wonderful job. Oh the patience you have:)

    Thank you so much for the link Joyce. I used it in today's post which I am so excited for you to see. (It's a Chinese new Year tribute:) Not to worry though, I know how busy you are. Thanks so much for taking the time to share, Joyce and of course for the link:)

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  7. Joyce, this is one of my CNY favourite. My aunt used to make herself but she "quit" many yrs ago so now we have to "out source" lol.

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  8. Hi Joyce,
    I enjoy baking the CNY cookies so much and have been baking. There're so many cookies to try out from this CNY Bake Along. Haven't got the time the link up.

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  9. Excellent and delicious looking array of chinese cookies for the upcoming Chinese New Year.
    Deepa

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  10. I have bookmarked this kuih from a few Deepavali ago and yet still procrastinating lol! Let's see if I can get it done next year:P

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  11. Your kuih rose looks beautiful! I have never had it before either in Indonesia or Australia, but the kuih reminds me with kue semprong that I had during my childhood.

    Jessica

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  12. Joyce, very nice kuih rose. Did this long, long time ago. I wasn't please with the kuih so I stopped preparing them. Maybe should try your way.

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  13. Wow, Joyce! You have pictures of every single step showing how you made these Kuih Rose. You are fantastic!

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    Replies
    1. Forgot to mention that I'm scare of deep-frying... I can run many many many marathons rather than deep-frying.... hee hee. At times, I have no choice and will embrace myself to do it but honestly, running to me is still way way easier than deep-frying :p

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  14. Wow, this is my hubby's favourite! He asked me to make this for him... but I can't bear the thought of deep frying :P

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  15. Oh Joyce this kuih rose are so pretty...I saw them at Louise's...very impressive.

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  16. i salute you for making this as i think this is really involves lots of sweat and tired muscles too!

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